Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

Description

Andy Warhol harnessed the power of celebrity, consumer goods, sex, and disaster to create his iconic Pop Art—and the foundation of his extraordinary career was in printmaking. 

Andy Warhol harnessed the power of celebrity, consumer goods, sex, and disaster to create his iconic Pop Art—and the foundation of his extraordinary career was in printmaking. 
[Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (II.128), edition AP 14/25, 1975, screenprint, Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, 2012.45a © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]
[Andy Warhol, Electric Chair (II.82), edition 183/250, 1971, screenprint, Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, 2002.82i © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]
[Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe (Marilyn), (II.23), AP edition C/Z, 1967, screenprint, Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, 2001.51b © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]
[Andy Warhol, Mao (II.94), edition 212/250, 1972, screenprint, Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, 2000.123e © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]
[Andy Warhol, Jacqueline Kennedy II (Jackie II), from 11 Pop Artists II (II.14), ed. 81/200, 1965 printed, released and dated in 1996, screenprint, Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, 2001.88e © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]
This retrospective encompasses over 250 works on loan from Schnitzer’s comprehensive collection, and establishes Warhol’s graphic production as it evolved over four decades. The exhibition explores his nearly singular use of the silkscreen process, which established Warhol as a creative provocateur. Spanning the museum’s two major main-floor exhibition galleries, it features instantly recognizable images such as Campbell’s Soup Can (Tomato) and Marilyn Monroe (Marilyn), alongside unique dresses, early graphic ephemera, and rare books. Warhol’s well-known fascination with popular culture instills the exhibition with a chronicle of American life, while anticipating the evolution of today’s hyper-saturated visual culture.

The museum is open Thursdays from noon to 8:00 PM and closed on Wednesdays

This exhibit will be part of Meet the Museum on April 27th. You can purchase tickets to this event here.